Facebook Moves to 20 Days Bereavement Leave, Makes Your Company Look Petty As Hell….

It’s true.  Facebook just moved their Bereavement Leave Policy to 20 days for an immediate family member, 10 days for an extended family member.

Damn. More from TechCrunch:

“On her personal Facebook account Tuesday, COO Sheryl Sandberg announced an update to the company’s employee benefits, which are newly enhanced to ease the lives of new parents and grieving employees alike.

Sandberg noted that the decision intends to lead the charge for policies that help new parents as well as families that are grieving the loss of a loved one. In the post, Sandberg noted her own experience as a mother and the “nightmare” surrounding the unexpected death of her husband in shaping her perspective.

“Starting today, Facebook employees will have up to 20 days paid leave to grieve an immediate family member, up to 10 days to grieve an extended family member, and will be able to take up to six weeks of paid leave to care for a sick relative,” Sandberg writes. “We’re also introducing paid family sick time – three days to take care of a family member with a short-term illness, like a child with the flu.”

What’s your bereavement policy again?  3 days for a family member?  You look kind of petty next to the mighty Facebook.

But seriously – I think every HR Pro looks at this policy and says three things:

  1. Yes – it really does take that long to even begin to move forward when you lose an immediate family member.
  2. No – 10 days or 2 weeks for an extended family member? Well, you hadn’t even seen your grandpa for 2 years, didn’t really like to be around him at Christmas and let’s face it, you loved to make fun of his Milwaukee’s Best consumption.  2 weeks is a bit of overkill.  
  3. While I like #1, my company has no chance of taking that stance. The cost, gaps in coverage and paranoia of fraud conspire to make it impossible for us to even increase our policy from 3 days.

Of course, the big thing to remember here is that Facebook is doing organizationally what your best managers have always done with key people who lost a parent, spouse or child – telling them to come back when they’re ready, and not rush.

Your managers have to hide that from your company – Facebook is institutionalizing it.

 

 

This post originally appeared on The HR Capitalist
Author: Kris Dunn