The HR Capitalist Playbook for Men Avoiding Workplace Harassment Claims…

Harassment claims have been in the news lately, and it’s an interesting time for HR leaders.  Whether you’re talking about the latest Harvey Weinstein reports or all the crazy stuff that went down at Uber, you’ve probably never had everyone’s attention on the male side of the house like you do today.

What do you do with that attention? Well, it’s probably not enough just to email Harvey Weinstein and Uber rundowns to your management team.  While that seems reasonable, a new report from The New York Times shows that all the well-intentioned promises may have resulted in some serious unintended consequences:

“A big chill came across Silicon Valley in the wake of all these stories, and people are hyper-aware and scared of behaving wrongly, so I think they’re drawing all kinds of parameters,” an anonymous venture capitalist told the Times.

The anonymous VC told the Times that he’s actually cancelled one-on-one meetings with female engineers and potential recruits to protect himself from any “reputational risk.”

YEP – THESE ARE ARE MALE MANAGERS.  SIMPLE FOLK.  CAVEMEN.  “SOMEBODY GOT A HARASSMENT CLAIM, SO I’M NOT MEETING ALONE WITH LADIES”.

WTF…

As much as I’d like to think this attitude doesn’t touch companies like yours and mine, it does.  It’s the “let’s take our ball and go home” mentality.  Crazy but true.

Lucky for you, I’m here as a guy HR leader to give you my straight up Playbook for Men Avoiding Workplace Harassment Claims.  Here we go:

1–Don’t have designs on sleeping with someone at work.  Whether you’re single or married, don’t do it.  I’m not the morality police, but if you target someone for romance at work, you get what you get.  It’s just problematic.  Don’t do it.  And for the ladies I should mention this (morality alert!), if you’re married, don’t be a sleaze.  Honor the commitment.  But if you’re incapable of that, stay out of the workplace, Jack.

2–When on the road, don’t do stupid stuff.  I’m on the road a lot, and things like having a lady hold your bag in her room is just problematic.  Check your bag and handle small stuff on the road without treating a female co-worker like your wife/girlfriend.

3–Be personable in conversation without probing.  Look, it’s OK to make small talk about life with your female co-workers, and every once in awhile, it goes to a place of personal information.  It’s not uncommon for that to happen, what matters is what happens next.  Don’t probe for more, get out and take the conversation back to something rivaling a mundane USA Today article.

4–Hold your one-on-one meetings with females in public or somewhat public places.  The more private the room is, the more you really don’t need to be there.  If you meet on the road in a hotel room with a female, you’re a moron.

BONUS – and I call this the Harvey Weinstein rule – don’t answer the door on the road in a robe.  Who the #### uses a robe in hotel room?

That’s what I got.  What do you have to add?

This post originally appeared on The HR Capitalist
Author: Kris Dunn